Tag Archives: wellbeing

Why we’re focusing on improving services for frequent users

A speech bubble with the title of Designing effective services for frequent usersWhy is the Good Practice Exchange at the Wales Audit Office running seminars that focus on frequent users? Dyfrig Williams outlines our thinking and how services can provide efficient citizen-centred public services.

The Good Practice Exchange at the Wales Audit Office decide on our programme of events based on the following criteria:

  • New legislation and other significant developments affecting public service delivery
  • Work undertaken by the Wales Audit Office
  • Topics that are identified through consultation with key stakeholders

In the case of our seminar on Designing effective services for frequent users, it was a combination of all three.

Legislation

If you’ve attended any of our recent seminars, you’ll have heard the Auditor General for Wales talking about how the Wellbeing of Future Generations Act is a gamechanger for Welsh public services. Organisations are required to integrate and collaborate; to think about prevention and the long term; and to involve people.

The Social Services and Wellbeing Act reinforces this by focusing on people, wellbeing, prevention, partnership and integration. The current public service environment clearly supports public service delivery that centres on citizens. If you’re looking to revamp your service to meet this focus, then these acts provide a framework and a rationale for change.

Audit work

Our colleagues in the Health Audit team approached us to put a seminar together on Designing effective services for frequent users as they were reviewing emergency ambulance services commissioning. Fflur Jones wrote a great post for the Wales Audit Office on joining a Welsh ambulance crew for a night shift, where she says that:

“The calls ranged from the routine to the extreme: from a caller that did not require any urgent treatment who had contacted the service for the third time that night to a patient suffering life-changing injuries as a result of a road traffic collision. I’m assured that the life of a paramedic is never dull…..

“Calling an ambulance is not always the right choice and other alternatives, such as pharmacies and out of hours services can get patients seen quicker and allow ambulances to respond to the cases where they’re most needed. It also taught me that the need for the public sector to work together to provide better services and to provide services for unmet needs and to fill service gaps is greater than ever.”

The Good Practice Exchange have been working on our first piece of audit work on behaviour change, where we’ve worked with Good Practice Wales and a range of other organisations on festivals in Bangor and Swansea. Behaviour Change techniques can potentially improve public services when there are increasing demands placed upon them by enabling people to choose the right service in the right circumstance.

The Wales Audit Office’s Picture of Public Services report also paints a stark picture of the challenges that devolved public services’ face. The report shows that public services have faced significant and growing financial, demand and capacity pressures since the previous report in  2011. Some of the headline messages include that:

  • Organisations are in a position where they have to take well-managed risks to deliver sustainable solutions to financial and demand pressures on public services
  • there are difficult barriers to overcome in order to radically reshape services, including political and cultural barriers
  • ‘What gets measured gets managed’ – public services are increasingly adopting ‘outcome’ measures, but there remains a tendency to measure and manage how much activity is going on and how long it takes
  • public services need to work together through the difficult choices to understand the short and long-term impacts for the public and other public services, and to mitigate those impacts where possible.

From a purely economic perspective, the case for change is clear. Public services will continue to waste valuable resources unless we work together, resources that could be better spent to provide services that people actually want.

And to me that’s the crux of it – more than anything services need to be fit for purpose so that they provide what people really want. On my last day of working for Participation Cymru, I wrote that working with the Citizen’s Panel for Social Services had been the most fulfilling work that I had ever done. Seeing people actively challenge systems that had repeatedly let them down because they believed that things could and should be better was incredible. I’ve been lucky enough to work with some fantastic teams, projects and organisations since working for the Good Practice Exchange, but unfortunately these services are still the exception rather than the norm.

Working with key stakeholders

Every event that we run is developed in conjunction with a range of stakeholders, and this is no different. We’ll have speakers from local authorities, health boards, the Ambulance Service, Fire Service and the Older People’s Commissioner. More than anything though, the event will look to share good practice from delegates’ own experiences and will throw out issues that people are facing to the collective expertise at the event.

We’ll also be ensuring that the focus of the event is firmly on what people want from their services. When I was tasked with working on this event, I immediately thought of a workshop that Simon Pickthall from Vanguard delivered at our Reshaping Services with the public event. In this seminar Simon shared how traditional public service interventions had failed to meet people’s needs because inefficiencies were resulting from maintaining broken organisational processes. These inefficiencies become obvious when we think about how public services work – people are made to fit into organisational silos, instead of organisations working together to meet people’s needs. Simon gives a really good overview of some of what he’ll be talking about at 6:37 in the below video.

The Stoke-on-Trent case study in the Picture of Public Services report (p.108) is an example of the approach that Simon will share. But we won’t be telling people what to do or directing people to use particular methods. We don’t believe that one size fits all – we need to look at the good work that organisations are doing and think about how we might adapt those approaches to suit the needs of people in our areas. And if we can do that, then we’ll be better placed to deliver the best possible services for the people of Wales.

The future of parks and their positive impact on wellbeing

How can we make parks sustainable and boost the wellbeing of the people that we serve as Welsh public services? Bethan Smith reflects on the lessons learnt from last year’s Parks seminar.

In a recent report on The State of UK Public Parks 2016, The Heritage Lottery Fund says park managers expect further cuts, and a huge loss of skilled staff over the next three years.

In Wales, 80% of councils anticipated budget cuts of 10% or more over the next three years, and 70% of parks are expected to be declining in the same period, the highest figures across the whole of the UK. [1]

When I read the report, I was startled by the figures. Parks are a major part of most communities, they are a place for children to play, a place to walk the dog or a place just to sit and relax. Most of us at some point in our life have used parks, and they can play a big role in improving our wellbeing.

The report reminded me of our event last year on ‘The future of parks and their positive impact on wellbeing’. At this event, we showcased a number of examples of organisations that have tried and tested new ways of working to maximise use of parks and help improve wellbeing.

Go to the Park

One of those examples was ‘Go to the Park’. Based in Towneley Park (Burnley’s largest heritage park covering 200 hectares) and extending across five other heritage parks, ‘Go to the Park’ developed an alternative model of park and green space management that sustainably manages large areas of parks and green spaces using ecological and permaculture techniques. The project has tested the opportunities to save money by adopting ecological and permaculture techniques to manage heritage parks, earn money from wildflower crops, bees and wood fuel, engage people through their ‘Volunteer in Parks’ programme and increase the wildlife value of our green spaces.

My favourite part of this initiative was the development of the world’s first urban bee hive cage which provides protection to honey bees. Funded through Nesta, Heritage Lottery Fund and Big Lottery ‘Rethinking Parks’ programme, the initiative aims to improve habitats for bees and other pollinators such as butterflies in Burnley parks and green spaces.

beekeeping-image

You can find out more information on this initiative through Nestas website and it’s worth reading Simon Goff’s blog on the impact the project has had.

Digital giving technologies

Bournemouth Borough Council created a foundation for parks across its authority so peoples’ affection for their parks and gardens translates to giving. The team explored how new digital giving technologies can make it easy for people to give to the parks in real time. They also tested whether the opportunity for people to leave a legacy donation is a viable option to sustain their parks and gardens. The approach is based on learning from models already being used in the United States, such as in Seattle.

You can find out more information on this project through Nesta’s blog.

Actif Woods Wales

Actif Woods Wales is a project that helps people improve their health and wellbeing by getting them involved in activities in woodlands. It’s delivered by a small, part-time team at Coed Lleol, the Welsh arm of the Small Woods Association, in partnership with a wide range of voluntary, community-based and public sector organisations and numerous independent activity providers in 5 areas of Wales.

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The project started in 2010 and has come a long way since then. Dr Kate Hamilton, who presented at our events, wrote a fantastic blog for us last year which provides more information about the project. Further to that, Kate also wrote a blog which shared their evaluation processes within Actif Woods Wales.

The Rethinking Parks programme has resulted in a number of fantastic initiatives where organisations are using different approaches to utilise parks. The report on Learning to Rethink Parks is well worth a read.

Parks are such an asset to our communities and we need new visions of how parks can be managed differently, how they can empower communities and be sustainable.

[1] http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-37288115

How Swansea Council undertook a scrutiny inquiry into their culture

Logo of the future of governance: Effective decision making for current and future generations

The Wellbeing of Future Generations Act requires organisations to go beyond tinkering at the edge of services into wider cultural change. Dyfrig Williams looks at what can we learn from the City and County of Swansea’s Scrutiny Inquiry into their corporate culture.

Culture is one of those intractable topics. When a problem is cultural, it means there’s no quick fix, no one process to tweak that will automatically help organisations to improve their work.

The good side of this is that it means that organisations tend to go beyond tick box solutions when they identify cultural issues in order to deliver real and lasting change. The bad side of it is that sometimes cultural change is seen as being so difficult that it doesn’t get done at all – the problem is too big to get to grips with.

So when I heard about the City and County of Swansea’s Scrutiny Inquiry into their Corporate Culture, I was immediately interested.

So why did they set up the inquiry?

Councillor Andrew Jones, the Convener of Corporate Culture Scrutiny Inquiry Panel said that:

‘The topic was chosen because, as a Council our corporate culture underpins everything we do, from how we engage with our citizens and provide services to how we treat our staff and grow and develop as an organisation. The challenges faced by the reductions to council budgets pose a threat to that notion of a shared culture. We therefore as Councillors, management and staff have a shared responsibility to respond to these challenges by developing a can do culture that ensures the citizens of Swansea continue to receive the best Council service possible.’

Getting things right at the start

So what can we learn from the pro-active steps that the council have taken to identify ways of improving their culture?

When I spoke to Michelle Roberts from the City and County of Swansea’s Scrutiny team, she emphasised the importance of getting the parameters of the inquiry right at the outset in order to focus on the right areas. The rationale of the review was to ensure that:

  • The council has the right corporate culture to tackle the challenges it faces
  • They create a can do culture to help turn the city around
  • Staff culture is focused on empowerment, personal responsibility, innovation and collaboration.

It’s great to see how the council have ensured that the inquiry has an ongoing legacy by linking it to the work of Leanne Cutts, who’s their Innovation Co-ordinator. As the Wellbeing of Future Generations Act requires, they’ve looked at their long term goals, whilst also identifying quick wins and medium term objectives.

There are some eye-catching proposals that focus on the organisation’s people. They cover the whole staff journey from corporate inductions, mainstreaming innovation into appraisals and developing personal skills to avoid buying in expertise.

Failure

We’ve done a fair bit of work around failure over the last couple of years through our Manager Chris Bolton. This work has underpinned a lot of our information sharing and our focus on improvement. So it’s great to see that the council are looking at how they can move away from a blame culture, whilst recognising the external issues that make it difficult (I’ve previously blogged on complex environments and failure). If we’re going to meet the expectations of the Wellbeing of Future Generations Act, we have to be able to take well managed risks and build upon the lessons from failure, as Huw Vaughan Thomas, the Auditor General for Wales, discusses in the video below.

Where to start?

If you want to examine the culture of your organisation, it’s well worth taking a look at this Culture Mapping Tool that’s been developed by Dave Gray, and which The Satori Lab have been using in their work. The stated and unstated levers of the tool are really useful in terms of thinking about what drives the behaviour of public service staff and organisations.

At the Wales Audit Office, we’re working on our approach to auditing the Wellbeing of Future Generations Act. For us as an audit body and for public services generally, it means that we have to change. If organisations try to deliver the seven wellbeing goals through the five ways of working without changing what they do, they’re likely to fail.

The Act gives us the chance to do things a bit differently in Wales. In a time of austerity, we can’t deliver the aspirations of the act whilst tinkering around the edges and adapting what we currently do. For the people of Wales to get the public services that they deserve, we need wholesale cultural change.

YMCA Plas: A vision for a better Roath

How do organisations develop a strategy for a community asset? Dyfrig Williams visited YMCA Plas (formerly Plasnewydd Community Centre) in Roath to find out.

A photo of YMCA Plas

YMCA Plas

Throughout my recent posts on asset transfer, I’ve visited organisations that have gone through the asset transfer process and are now on the other side. My final visit was a bit different, as it took me to an organisation who are developing their business plan for the site. I went to see the YMCA, who have taken on the old Plasnewydd Community Centre building on a leasehold basis for a hundred years from Cardiff Council. They are looking to redevelop the site, and originally wanted the building on a freehold basis to make the most of it.

Like all the other asset transfers in this series, it wouldn’t have been able to take place without working closely with the council. The transfer comes with an agreement for 25 years rent-free, without which the YMCA would not have been in a position to take the asset transfer forward. This has given them breathing space, and enabled them to put the right building blocks in place to encourage growth.

The price of property in Cardiff made it difficult to find suitable premises, especially with the huge increase in the area’s student market. But now the deal has been done, the move will enable the YMCA’s Youth and Community arm to get out from under the homeless remit that YMCA are widely connected to in the area.

The council didn’t want to restrict how the YMCA makes use of the site, but it has stipulated that it must maintain community usage. The Local Authority deliberately didn’t tie the YMCA into a restrictive agreement, and the only other condition is that they can only sub-let 33% of the site. The YMCA maintained throughout the negotiation process that they would be unable to take on the staff through TUPE, as they didn’t have the capacity to do so.

What is the strategy for YMCA Plas?

As the lease for the building is so long, YMCA Plas needs to be multi-use, so that if circumstance change the building can still be functional. Fewer and fewer people have been coming to the building as it’s been earmarked for closure for quite some time, so the YMCA are currently running events to re-engage the community, and are looking to consult on its future.

The aim is for YMCA Plas to be a community hub for local groups and people in the area. They want to develop a sport facility with space for a gym to generate income, which will give the centre a health and wellbeing focus.

The organisation are also developing a childcare strategy and a nursery. There is a lack of affordable childcare in the area, which they’ve identified through working with Communities First. Not many people know that the YMCA is the biggest childcare provider in UK, which the organisation can draw on to take this part of the plan forward. They are also looking to rent out rooms where possible and to rent spaces to organisations whose purpose aligns with their aims and objectives.

The entrance to the building is on the side of the street, so the organisation is looking to move the entrance so that it focuses on footfall from the street. This will clearly show that it’s open and accessible to the public, instead of relying on people to go down the side street.

Lessons learnt

Throughout the process the organisation focussed on the council’s timelines, which meant that the focus wasn’t always as intense on their own requirements. As staff were not transferred over to the organisation, embedding new staff whilst taking over a new facility was a big challenge. This meant that they couldn’t hit the ground running in the way that they would have liked, and the transfer involved so much work it was difficult to focus on what was going to happen afterwards. However the core message in the short term has been to maintain the current business, which doesn’t pay the bills but does contribute to it. Because of effective planning they are able to soak up the immediate losses whilst the business plan is being developed. The challenge now is for the organisation to continue to run the business whilst developing a path forward.

A vision for the future

I’ve lived in Roath for the past few years, and it’s a vibrant and diverse place to live. I’ve given blood at the centre a few times, but I must admit that I haven’t made the most of the facility that’s been on my doorstep.

The area has lots of people living side by side, but who aren’t always integrated. I’m all for anything that brings people together in the area, and I’m excited to see how the YMCA make their vision for the community centre into a reality by involving community groups and the people of Roath.

The Muni Arts Centre: An asset transfer driven by the community

The closure of the Muni Arts Centre in Pontypridd prompted an outcry, which in turn prompted a community led bid to take it over. Dyfrig Williams visited the thriving centre to find out how it’s progressed since the asset transfer.

Chris Bolton wrote a post a while back about how annoying your citizens can lead to community action. It’s a thought-provoking read about how closing a community asset can lead to a strong public response, and that public services can build on the strength of this reaction.

It was fascinating to see how that has happened at the Muni Arts Centre, where a grass roots campaign to save the centre and develop it sprung from the decision to close its doors by the council.

Background

The Muni Arts Centre

The Muni Arts Centre

There was a huge outcry when the decision was made to discontinue the Muni Centre from council cultural services. 150 people attended a consultation event on the future of the building in the space of a couple of hours. A number of groups wanted to make sure it stayed open, and a number of companies expressed an interest in making the building a base for their business. Artis Community, Pontypridd Town Council, Cylch Cymreig and the Coalfields Regeneration Trust came together as the Muni Working Group and quickly formed the newly incorporated Muni Arts Centre Limited. They built on their similarities and strengths to develop the bid, which is remarkably similar to the Assets Based Community Development approach on the Nurture Development site that Chris references in his blog.

In terms of building on the strengths within the community, there’s no better place to start than with the board itself. Taking control of a building like the Muni is a huge responsibility, but the Muni’s board members are well placed to do so and to put strong governance processes in place. Jon Huish, a former councillor, has a great understanding of council processes and the public sector. Alun Taylor of the Coalfields Regeneration Trust specialises in governance. Rob Hughes, the Chair of Cylch Cymreig, runs a festival in Ynys-y-Bwl, and Gethin Williams, Chief Executive of the Town Council is also a Solicitor. Wendy York, the Chief Executive of Artis Community was responsible for much of the groundwork, has extensive experience of the arts and strong voluntary sector networks.

The council faced criticism from the community over its initial decision, and the asset transfers it had previously dealt with were on a much smaller scale. They were clear that they wanted to help the process and created an enabling grant fund. They took a risk in choosing to transfer the asset to the community, when a private sector development would have clear commercial benefits. It’s an example of decision making that focuses on the long term, and it’s the kind of approach that public services will have to show has been considered under the Wellbeing of Future Generations Act.

The community

With such a strong board, it would be easy for them to do what many other organisations have done over the years and use their own individual visions as a roadmap for the Muni. But the business case was based on the vision of the 150 people who attended the consultation event. It is rooted in the community, with the Muni as a hub for the regeneration for the wider area and the arts’ place within it.

A photo of the Think Food Life café inside the Muni

The Think Food Life café at the Muni

The café at the Muni is a social enterprise called Think Food Life, which focuses on people’s health and wellbeing by providing nutritional food. It’s the first café in Pontypridd that can cater for specific dietary requirements, and it aims for 80% of its food to come from local sources. There was interest from Merthyr and Valleys Mind to set up an allotment to provide vegetables for the Muni, and the idea was strengthened by the Muni Project veteran’s group, who proposed work on garden land at the Muni with potential support from the allotments society. The Muni has received funding from the Armed Forces Community Covenant Grant as the recruitment centre used to be next door, which provides opportunities for veterans to take part in the Muni’s work, be it through volunteering or directly in the arts.

A Fit for Life project will also look to connect health and fitness work to the nutritional focus of the café, which shows how the Muni is looking to go beyond a strictly arts focus and be a hub for the entire community. The Muni is also looking at bringing organisations together at a strategic level to enable people to do more for themselves through working with Pontypridd YMCA and the development of the Courthouse, which will support the startup and growth of social enterprise.

Passion

This all shows what is possible when projects are based on the passion and talent of the community. The building itself is really impressive, just like the drive and determination of the board and the community members who’ve put in such incredible effort to make the project a success. If you’re looking to transfer an asset to the community, it’s worth asking how can you genuinely work with the community and build on their strengths?

Actif Woods Wales

This blog is by Dr Kate Hamilton who recently presented at The Future of Parks and the Positive Impact on Well Being. This is the first in a series of blogs sharing the impact of what Actif Woods Wales do, why, and how. Kate will also be blogging about the challenges of monitoring and evaluating wellbeing, and understanding the impact.

 

What is Actif Woods Wales?

Actif Woods Wales is a project that helps people improve their health and wellbeing by getting them involved in activities in woodlands. It’s delivered by a small, part-time team of us at Coed Lleol, the Welsh arm of the Small Woods Association, in partnership with a wide range of voluntary, community-based and public sector organisations and numerous independent activity providers in 5 areas of Wales.

What do we do?

At its simplest Actif Woods Wales invites people to participate in facilitated group activity sessions in woodlands. The activities vary from walking and woodland gym sessions to bush craft, green woodworking, conservation tasks, arts, crafts and mindfulness. A key operating principle is that participants shape what they’re offered, telling us what they do and don’t like, trying out new things from time to time and developing programmes which reflect their capacities, interests and goals.

Some participants are referred from such organisations as Mind, Alzheimer’s Society, Macmillan Cancer or the National Exercise Referral Scheme, and occasionally sympathetic GPs. Others come because they’ve seen our posters up in the neighbourhood, heard about us in local or social media, or through word of mouth.

We are totally inclusive

We don’t turn anyone away: our strapline is ‘getting healthy the woodland way’ so we assume that anyone responding to that must feel they have something to gain and can benefit from what we offer. This means we end up with a tremendously diverse range of participants.

Why woodlands?

In a nutshell, woodlands are good for people – physically, mentally and emotionally. As well as our own experience there is an extensive scientific evidence base which shows this, looking at both forests in particular and green care and contact with nature in general.

So, we are confident that what we offer is good for people’s health and wellbeing: it does ‘make people better’. At the same time it’s not a treatment or a therapy in a conventional sense. That is, we are not doctors or therapists, we don’t diagnose people’s health conditions and we don’t put together courses of treatment that are specific to an individual’s needs. Instead, participants decide for themselves whether and how intensively they want to join in: we just check that they are fit to participate and willing to tell us what we need to know about their capacities and limitations, and then take a gentle and iterative approach to introducing them to activities, adapting and extending in response to their feedback.

Why this approach works

It works because what’s offered is sensitive to people’s needs and capacities. Every session is facilitated by skilled and experienced activity leaders, and one of the key skills they demonstrate every session is the ability to accommodate different needs and interests and improvise around the unexpected, whilst keeping everyone safe, happy and to time.

It also works because the approach is holistic, integrating exercise, being in nature and taking part in purposeful activities into one safe and supported experience. It taps into participants’ needs on many levels and offers them multiple pathways to wellbeing. If you’re familiar with the 5 Ways to Wellbeing, for instance, you’ll notice that all of these are present. It also empowers people to forge a positive relationship with nature, and encourages them to turn to this as a lifelong strategy for looking after themselves.

Perhaps most importantly, participants are there as whole people: they are not defined or labelled by their condition and, beyond telling us what we need to know to keep them safe, it’s up to them whether they find it useful to talk to us – or anyone else – about it or not. This in itself seems to be a hugely important contrast with participants’ other health care experiences and strikes me as a key part of what makes it so effective.

Conservation Work in Coed Geufron

Conservation in Coed Geufron

What the feedback says

To me one of the most interesting things is that many, many participants report positive impacts on aspects of their wellbeing that go far beyond what they originally came for. In particular, lots of participants join with an idea such as needing to get a bit fitter, but don’t consider themselves to need improved mental or social health. Yet, after attending for a while they will often tell us that what they really appreciate are unexpected impacts like de-stressing, relaxing, gaining confidence, and enjoying other people’s company.

It’s also evident that some participants report wellbeing benefits even when objectively their underlying health condition has not – or cannot be – improved. For those people what the project offers is not a solution to their health problems per se but new opportunities and positive, sustainable strategies for coping with the inevitable ups and downs or long term decline associated with their diagnosis. And on this level it seems that the whole-person, holistic approach is particularly welcome.

All of these observations strike me as strengths, not weaknesses, of the approach we take – but they can make it pretty challenging when it comes to comparing our impacts with other types of health intervention and persuading the professionals to take it seriously (of which more in the next blog!). But it’s worth reminding ourselves that even the most mainstream of definitions of health appreciates that

‘Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity’ World Health Organisation 1946

So there’s nothing new-fangled or alternative about looking beyond the direct treatment of diagnosed illness for ways to improve health. This is what Actif Woods is out there doing, and we are ready and willing to collaborate with whoever else is interested in learning from it.

Unmentoring 3: Digital thinking and staff trust

In the latest of a series of posts on LocalGovDigital’s Unmentoring, Dyfrig Williams reflects on a discussion with Kelly Doonan of Devon County Council.

When the Auditor General for Wales opens our shared learning seminars, he advocates well managed risk taking, as public services will not be able to continue in their current form.

In a recent blogpost, Phil Rumens examined the five stages of digital transformation. This really shows the added value of thinking about services in terms of digital provision. With that concept in mind, my latest Unmentoring discussion with Kelly Doonan of Devon County Council was timed perfectly.

Devon’s attitude to digital

Kelly’s written a great blogpost that outlines why publishing information online should be approached differently to traditional print media. She also gave a great example of how they’d put this thinking into action when they were asked to create a paper directory of local services for veterans.

The Communications Team didn’t support it because it would date almost immediately. It’s also difficult to measure its effectiveness, there was no budget to reprint or maintain it and there was no planned way of getting the directories to the veterans.

A screenshot of the proposed Devon County Council Veterans Site

A screenshot of the proposed Devon County Council Veterans Site

What I love is that rather than hinder the project, the team looked at how they could enable a better online product that could be accessed by veterans in Devon or those that haven’t been discharged yet, but are planning to come to Devon.

Kelly met with professionals who work with veterans to discuss it, and the Armed Forces Wellbeing Partnership revised and improved the plan from their feedback. They then held a discovery session with veterans to find out what they wanted to know, how they would search for it and how they would want a website to look. Kelly then created a sitemap, started writing content and the designer created the wireframe.

The first iteration of the site will go live on 8 December. All of a sudden a one-off print run has developed into a product that meets user needs and has a longer term effect – fantastic stuff!

What did I share?

Kelly mentioned the added value that the embedded comms team in Devon Council could provide to communications work. I mentioned Professor Ros Searle’s presentation at our shared learning event on staff trust. One of Ros’ points was on how internal communication can preserve and build trust within public services.

According to a CIPD report on trust, senior managers are overly optimistic in terms of how much frontline workers trust them, as 34% of staff don’t trust their senior managers. The problem is particularly acute in larger organisations, and especially hierarchical organisations where there is a perceived distance between managers and their staff. Internal communication is really important to ensure that lack of trust doesn’t degenerate into counterproductive behaviour such as theft and fraud. In fact with 37% of job satisfaction coming from trust, a high trusting organisation is likely to have staff that put in more effort, with improved co-operation, recruitment and better performance.

Trust is also linked to innovation. To go back to the Auditor General’s point, will staff be prepared to take well managed risks if they don’t feel they will be backed and trusted by their managers? For the kind of innovation we need in a time of declining resources, trust is key.

Bara Brith Camp

I’ll be sharing the key messages from the Staff Trust event at Bara Brith Camp, which is a free event that’s been organised by The Satori Lab to provide a space to progress conversations from GovCamp Cymru. If you missed the unconference, we’ve produced a Storify and the below video to summarise the day.

So I’ll hopefully see you there – I’m looking forward to finding out from attendees how we can help to improve trust levels in Welsh public services, and to boost levels of productivity and innovation in the process.