Tag Archives: podcasts

What I learnt from taking part in the #NatterOn Podcast

The way that we learn and consume information is constantly evolving. Dyfrig Williams reflects on what he learnt from taking part in the NatterOn podcast.

A copy of the NatterOn Podcast logo

For the last year or so I’ve been listening to podcasts to broaden my awareness of what’s happening in the world and to get a better understanding of how I can improve my work. The Podcast Addict app has been great in managing interesting podcasts because it brings a range of podcasts together into one feed.

Podcasts that I’ve found particularly helpful are:

I’d add the NatterOn podcast to that list too. It’s a podcast the looks at digital and marketing that’s put together by Helen Reynolds and Ben Proctor, who are two of the most switched on people I know. Helen gets how communications are being changed by social media more than anyone else I’ve ever met. And I’ve learnt so much about data from Ben. I particularly recommend his post on Data Maturity in local government, which has been the basis of my thinking on acquiring data with the Wales Audit Office’s Data and Tech Working Group.

So when they asked me to take part in the podcast, I jumped at the chance because I’d basically get an hour to pick their brains on interesting public service improvement topics.

So what did I learn?

Unsurprisingly, a lot. Helen shared a really interesting post on Unconscious Bias, which brings together many different types of bias into four main problems:

  • We aggressively filter information to avoid information overload.
  • Lack of meaning is confusing, so we fill in the gaps.
  • We need to act fast, so we jump to conclusions.
  • We’re working in complex environments so we focus on the important bits. Decisions inform our mental models of the world.

So what does this mean for public services? For me, it’s about awareness. If we take the time to actively reflect on these problems, then we can be more conscious of our bias as we interact with people and deliver services. We’ve already identified this as an issue at the Wales Audit Office, so we held an internal event to reflect on this. The Storify includes lots of useful resources, including Harvard’s Implicit Associations Test.

We also had a really good conversation about trust, PR and public services after Ben shared a post on the war on truth. Helen looked at the professions topping the Edelman Trust Barometer, which finds that people’s trust in government is generally a reflection of how content Britons are with their lot. This has big implications for how we interact with people from different socio-economic backgrounds.

As a project, we’ve undertaken work ourselves on looking at the importance of staff trust in public services. It’s interesting to take some of the lessons around staff trust and applying it in a wider context of working with communities:

  • Ability – have we shown that we are competent at doing our job?
  • Benevolence – do we have benign motives and a concern for others beyond our own needs?
  • Integrity – are we principled? Are we clearly acting in a fair and honest way?
  • Predictability – are people aware of what we’re likely to do?

After sharing a post on GCHQ’s Digital Approach, I also learnt from Ben that the analogy of frogs in boiling water is a complete lie.

What else did I share?

The Good Practice Exchange is also pondering how we can help public services develop their approaches to the Wellbeing of Future Generations Act. So I shared Chris Bolton’s post on Sustainable Decision Making and Simulation Games as it’s been useful in getting me to think differently about how we as a project might respond to the legislation in order to help services improve.

I’ve also been pondering about how we learn and develop in the workplace. In my ten years or so of working in public services, only three of the training courses I’ve attended have actually had any impact on my work. So how might we tie in our own learning and development with better organisations and improved public services? Carl Haggerty has written a great post on this.

Horses for courses

We have a slide that we use at our events that shows the many different that we share information – through our blog, social media, Randomised Coffee Trials, email and phone calls. We recognise that not everybody wants to receive information in the same form, and not everybody processes it the same way. One of the key principles of our work is that there isn’t a one size fits all approach for better services. Podcasts are another useful way of sharing learning and information, so it’s well worth having a listen to this and other podcasts to see whether they can help you improve your work and what you do.

The magical world of Podcasts

Podcasts

We’ve created a fair few podcasts since I started working for the Good Practice Exchange. It’s been a great way of capturing people’s views and evidencing what kind of impact our activities are having, and to also hear from people how we can best take our work forward.

For anyone looking to do cheap podcasting, phones and tablets are able to record good quality files these days (we’ve been using our personal ipads and Asus tablets), you can edit them using free software like Audacity (which is open source), and you can host them online using social media such as Soundcloud (where you can host up to 2 hours worth of audio for free) or Audioboo (where you can host an unlimited amount of audio files that are under 3 minutes long).

I’ve been doing this a while now, but since I’ve begun working here I’ve realised that the podcasts I’ve been recording aren’t as good as they could be. My colleague Chris’ podcast with Helen Reynolds first made me question the way I was doing things. Whilst I was recording clinical interviews capturing exactly what I needed to know, Chris’ effort was uplifting and captured both his and Helen’s personality. This was reinforced by an interview he conducted with Dr Sharon Evans from Abertawe Bro Morgannwg University Health Board, where the personal touch again works wonders.

Around this time I began attending the Geek Speak events in Cardiff. At the first event I went to Gareth Morlais led a session on digital storytelling. After his session (which was great), I relayed my thinking both to him and others around my podcasts.

Gareth’s digital stories are full of emotion, and I realised that that is what made them great – they are very human accounts of people’s experiences. Whilst I was getting the information I needed out of my interviews, they didn’t have the warmth I was looking for. I was getting people’s views to fit into my own story, as opposed to listening to people tell their own. I realised that I had been conducting interviews in a very old fashion way. In a world of web 2.0 where we share and interact with others, I was working in a one-sided model.

Now I’m very keen to collaborate with people so that both own the podcast and we both get what we want out of it. After all, it’s hard to sound excited about something you’ve had little input into.

My first couple of months here have been great. I’m learning new things from my colleagues all the time, and I can’t wait more of what I’ve learnt into practice.

– Dyfrig