Category Archives: Cymraeg

Building Resilient Communities: Mind the Gap

Charlotte Waite @charlotwaite from the ACE Support Hub @acehubwales has blogged for us ahead of our Building Resilient Communities Event.  She is challenging herself, and all of us, to be someone who contributes to resilient communities, which is very different from DOING resilient communities.

At a lovely lefty festival I had the privilege to be at this hot summer, my daughter came out of the impressively clean portaloo commenting on how she was going to take the toilet’s advice and ‘smile at someone today, because (she) might make all the difference’. What struck me was that she’d read the faded sticker and it had meant something to her. I too had read it (as I strategically hovered) and the words had passed through my eyes as if I was reading ‘mind the gap’ or ‘please drive carefully’. Yadayadayada. My brain must be sending a signal to my awareness saying “nothing to see here, we know all this already” and so I come out of the loo without a reflective moment. After all I’ve been doing ‘help’ in a ‘helping’ field for many years. I’ve been on the courses and given the lectures.  Smiling is the basic basics, everyone knows that.

Truth is, though, that between me and my 9 year old daughter, the person who needed a reminder about connecting and kindness is me. Because even in a festival of joy I was busy ‘doing’ festival, consuming and soaking up what I can, squeezing every ounce of hedonism out of MY weekend so I could feel that I’ve got what I came for. Ironically, part of what I came for, is a shared experience of happiness. It’s easy to spread love in a festival because the personal risk is much lower. Smiling, hugging, feasting, dancing, chatting… connecting and feeling alive are all part of what I paid for. I went home filled with love and paid-for shared happiness. Home to my street where I say hello to my immediate neighbours, chat with a couple of them about kids, parking, extensions and bin collections but generally we go about our lives independently.

So not much smiling, hugging, feasting, dancing…..connecting and feeling alive in my own manor. Hmm. Here the risk to me is much greater. Well, what if they don’t want to connect? What if they don’t like me? What if they find out what I’m really like? And anyway I’m too busy. I’m too busy rushing off to my community group all about kindness to ask my neighbour how she is, when I know her husband has left her and her children. Yes really. This was a real reflective moment on a rainy Wednesday evening when I saw her broken heart on her face as she went in her house as I was getting in the car. ‘Mind the Gap’ between my rhetoric and my behaviour loud and clear this time.

I took the risk and knocked the door, we talked about our lives, our children and began a connection. It was scary and I’m still not sure she likes me but I feel like I have communicated that she is not on her own and that feels very important.  It will take time.

So, am I saying we should model resilient communities on festivals? At a festival there’s no hierarchy, no supporters and supported, just people. Sharing joyful and fun activities together connects us: breaking bread, dancing, playing; losing inhibitions inherent in our real life roles as ‘helpers’ or even as neighbours. I’m not suggesting we go home and set up twee street parties but I am suggesting we take risks in relationships, without vulnerability we can’t create authentic relationships and yet we know it is authenticity in relationships that creates resilience. Knock the door, offer to break the bread.

How can we lose some of our personal inhibitions and find ways to connect joyfully, eye to eye (not screen to screen) without having to pay for the experience? Or professionally without ‘doing’ the best practice model when we get to work and demonstrating the outcomes to those that pay us. We know the importance of sports and community groups to build resilience in children (Link to resilience research here) but do we all get in our cars and drop our kids off at these while we catch up on screen time? I’m noticing the ‘please drive carefully’ as I navigate this one for myself. I could definitely bring more to this street party. I am challenging myself to BE someone who contributes to resilient communities, which is very different from DOING resilient communities. I’m reminding myself to stop for a minute and be curious. To see ‘mind the gap’ and notice where it applies to me but I can only see it if I’m going slowly enough to notice it and then notice how it makes me feel and be brave enough to bring myself to the party.

GSWAG: Keeping Data Live

Does your organisation have the right kind of data to future-proof decisions?

Hear how Gwent Strategic Well-being Assessment Group’s (GSWAG) are looking past traditional data sets to make their decisions about well-being. GSWAG want to know more about local conditions for well-being from the lived experiences of their residents, and are looking at likely future trends that may face the Gwent area over the next 25 years, to help better prepare and plan for the future. They’re using a very different type of data than they’re used to, getting out of their comfort zone to shape their decisions with future generations in mind. Watch our vlog to find out more

GSWAG: A Collaborative Partnership

Partnership working is the way forward for public service delivery. Partnership is hard work, we know that. But the benefits to public services are huge.

We recently got to hear about Gwent Strategic Wellbeing Assessment Group’s (“GSWAG”) approach, so we went along to one of their meetings.

We heard how they are working in partnership to achieve more by learning from each other, by collaborating on the same agenda items. They’re working under the Wellbeing of Future Generations Act, putting some of the five ways of working in practice. They’re able to avoid duplication, share their expertise by utilising a common language and giving each other the space to ensure they can discuss areas of contention in a constructive way. They recognise that by working in partnership, they can go far further and achieve far more than they would alone. You can find out more by getting in touch with Bernadette Elias or Lyndon Puddy.

Episode 1: Behaviour Change Insiders

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In Episode One, we speak with Rupert Moon, on working with rugby players at Rugby Gogledd Cymru to develop behaviours that went beyond the playing field (01.30 – 15.20 mins). Then, Professor Judy Hutchings talks to us about the KiVa anti-bullying programme in schools. Learning from Finland on how taking a whole school approach can change behaviours and reduce bullying (15.25 – 27.10 mins). Have a listen below:
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More details about the podcasts are available on our Behaviour Change Insiders Podcast Page.

Links to resources mentioned:

Wales Audit Office, Good Practice Exchange Podcast Page.

Bangor University KiVa Programme

Rupert Moon on sport and improving well being

Episode 5: Behaviour Change Insiders

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In Episode Five, Barod challenged us to “Swansea’s Got Jargon Busters”. This was run by Barod at the Swansea Behaviour Change Festival. The aim was to change behaviour around how people communicate, by getting them to take part in a game show where you get ‘buzzed out’ for using jargon. This podcast has four parts:

Part 1: Alan from Barod explains how Jargon Busters was developed;

Part 2: Alan and Simon from Barod take Chris from the Good Practice Exchange through an example of Jargon Busters (Chris doesn’t do very well);

Part 3: Anne from Barod talks about the evaluation of Jargon Busters and the impact on the behaviour of the people she spoke to,

Part 4: Ena from the Good Practice Exchange talks about how the experience of Jargon Busters changed her behaviour.

Useful Links:

The Barod website: www.barod.org

Easy Read version of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014

A blog post on the Party Blowers workshop that Barod ran at a Good Practice Exchange event in Cardiff

Episode 6: Behaviour Change Insiders

In Episode Six, Diana Reynolds, the Sustainable Development Change Manager at the Welsh Government, talks about an extensive programme to change how Civil Servants in Wales behave and work in connection with the Well-being of Future Generations Act. (2.50 -21.40 mins)

Then, Anna Sussex from WEDFAN (The Welsh Emergency Department Frequent Attenders Network) follows this with an example of where she has worked with an individual to reduce his A&E visits and keep him out of prison. (21.40- 31.40 mins). Have a listen below…

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Episode 4: Behaviour Change Insiders

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In Episode Four, Professor Dave Snowden explains his ‘Nudge Not Yank’ approach to behaviour change. Using narrative to identify where people are currently, their disposition to change and small nudges that will help then move. (2.45 – 8.15 mins)Andy Middleton talks about Minimum Viable Competency in key areas as a requirement for decision makers involved in trying to implement behaviour change as part of the Wellbeing of Future Generations Act. (8.20 – 21.10 mins)Professor Dave Snowden explains his Ritual Dissent Method.  Used to rapidly develop robust solutions that will stand up to examination in the real world. (21.15 – 27 mins). Listen below:

More details are available at the Wales Audit Office, Good Practice Exchange Podcast Page

Episode 3: Behaviour Change Insiders

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In Episode Three, Rachel Lilley from Aberystwyth University talks about changing how people think about energy use at home with Ymlaen Ceredigion. (1.43 – 9.20 mins). Then, Matt Stowe from Cartrefi Conwy explains the environmental improvements at Parc Peulwys Housing Estate, and how they changed behaviours and help gain a Keep Wales Tidy Green Flag award. (10.30 – 25.30 mins). Have a listen below:

Links to resources mentioned in the Podcast:

National Energy Action Cymru details of working with Ymlaen Ceredigion in partnership with Ceredigion County Council and Aberystwyth University including a link to a report from Rachel Lilley.

Parc Peuwlys Management Plan 2015-2020, produced by Cartrefi Conwy.  Report from BBC Wales on Parc Peulwys acheving the Keep Wales Tidy Green Flag award.

More details are available at the Wales Audit Office, Good Practice Exchange Podcast Page

Episode 2: Behaviour Change Insiders

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In Episode Two, we speak to Chris Subbe, who explains the ‘Wee Wheel’ (pictured), introduced to reduce acute kidney injury for hospital patients (1.45 – 7.30 mins). Then, Olwen Williams speaks on the ‘Test no Talk’ approach to improve sexual health screening (8.00 – 21.30 mins). Have a listen below:

Links to resources mentioned in the podcast:

Chris Subbe blog, An audible patient voiceand 1000 Lives Wee Wheel page

1000 Lives Compendium of Outpatient Improvement, report by Olwen Williams on : Self triage innovation in sexual health services – Test no Talk.

 More details at the Wales Audit Office, Good Practice Exchange Podcast Page.

Episode 1: Behaviour Change Insiders

episode1

In Episode One, we speak with Rupert Moon, on working with rugby players at Rugby Gogledd Cymru to develop behaviours that went beyond the playing field (01.30 – 15.20 mins). Then, Professor Judy Hutchings talks to us about the KiVa anti-bullying programme in schools. Learning from Finland on how taking a whole school approach can change behaviours and reduce bullying (15.25 – 27.10 mins). Have a listen below:
square_bci

More details about the podcasts are available on our Behaviour Change Insiders Podcast Page.

Links to resources mentioned:

Wales Audit Office, Good Practice Exchange Podcast Page.

Bangor University KiVa Programme

Rupert Moon on sport and improving well being