Monthly Archives: March 2018

Behaviour Change Insiders Podcast: Episode 2

 More details at the Wales Audit Office, Good Practice Exchange Podcast Page.

In Episode Two:

Chris Subbe  explaining the Wee Wheel introduced to reduce acute kidney injury for hospital patients (1.45 – 7.30 minutes).

Olwen Williams on the ‘Test no Talk’ approach to improve sexual health screening (8.00 – 21.30 minutes).

Links to resources mentioned:

Chris Subbe blog, An audible patient voice and 1000 Lives Wee Wheel page

Olwen Williams Wikipedia page

The role of scrutiny in relation to Future Generations – Environment


We recently held a Good Practice Seminar on ‘The role of scrutiny in relation to Future Generations’ at Cardiff and Llanrwst. This was very different seminar to our usual Good Practice events. As the Well-being of Future Generations Act is very much in its infancy, case studies reflecting the five ways of working are yet to emerge. So that meant we had to design a seminar to fit the need. We opted for a ‘learning through doing’ approach, which meant that the delegates worked jolly hard on the day.

We were also aware that how we were going to share the messages from the day, needed to be shared in a manageable way, so we are trialling sharing these through blogging. This is the first of a series of three blogs based on the characteristics of good scrutiny – Environment, Practice and Impact.

We’ve recognised, as a good practice team, that people like information in different ways. We’ve included the raw outputs from the day if you would like more detailed information.

On the day we asked delegates to feedback on the one thing that they were going to do differently as a result of the three workshops they attended. In this first blog we wanted to share with you some of the points that delegates shared after Workshop 1 – Environment. If you didn’t attend the event this blog will give you an insight into points to consider and reflect on if you are currently using these factors.

We thought it may be helpful if we put the outputs from the day into the following headings.

Public Engagement

I’ve used the words ‘Public Engagement’ to summarise one area of the statements delegates shared at the end of workshop 1 on the theme of Environment. It is clear to me that delegates understand the need to engage, listen, and consult more with their public to ensure that ‘real people’ have a chance to input their views. A two-way communication is key when making decisions, it was very pleasing to hear that this has been recognised and many delegates identified that making it more accessible and inclusive for questions to be asked and voices to be heard.

One delegate stated ‘‘People before process’ – consider emotional as well as financial support’.


This is another area that was mentioned a number of times in the feedback. I love that delegates are really seeing the importance of improving the way that they involve the local people and communities in shaping their futures – whether that be direct or early involvement, or involving partners like the 3rd sector as well as other public sector bodies.

‘Less focus on budget and more on decision making that matters’ – one delegate has written down.


A few delegates felt that feedback was important. Giving more feedback on the reasons behind the decision, and being clear on the purpose of what is trying to be achieved.


This feedback says to me that quite a few delegates feel that they need support to help them improve the understanding and work of scrutiny in relation to the well-being of future generations. Some mentioned that working in partnership between organisations to address the seven well-being goals of the WFG Act would be a big help to them. It would help them to ‘forward plan’ and to not think about annual budgets.

How can you improve the understanding of using the 5 ways of working in your organisation? Should they be used to shape and inform the decision making process at the earliest stage? These were a few questions that came out of this section of feedback.

One delegate wrote – ‘Scrutiny should not be linked to annual budgets. You can’t make progress for future generations when you are working in 12 month restrictive stretches.’


Lastly, a few points were made about needing a change in culture at all levels in order to think more long-term about effective scrutiny. Scrutiny should not just be about outcomes and budgets it should be about forward thinking to make a lasting, positive change. I am very happy to see that delegates are aware that this needs addressing and hopefully our seminar helped to reinforce the message of how important their role is shaping the future of our future generations.

‘Scrutineers to be aware of the importance of their role and the power scrutiny has to influence.’

Whilst preparing and shaping this seminar, we recognised that this is a step change for public services. Our colleague Tim Buckle wrote a great blog ahead of the seminar ‘Scrutiny for the well-being of future generations – more questions than answers?’ We encourage you to have a read when you have a few spare minutes.

Behaviour Change Insiders: Podcast Episode 1

square_bciIn episode one:

Rupert Moon – on working with rugby players at Rugby Gogledd Cymru to develop behaviours that went beyond the playing field (1.30 – 15.20 minutes)

Professor Judy Hutchings – on the KiVa anti bullying programme in schools. Learning from Finland on how taking a whole school approach can change behaviours and reduce bullying (15.25 – 27.10 minutes)

Links to resources mentioned:

Wales Audit Office, Good Practice Exchange Podcast Page.

Bangor University KiVa Programme

Rupert Moon on sport and improving well being  

Stay Well @ Home

by Emma Ralph from Stay Well @ Home

We are pleased to announce that the Stay Well@ Home Team will be presenting at this year’s ‘I’m a patient, get me out of here’ event. We thought it would be useful to give you a flavour of our exciting new service model before the event. But to truly hear about the fabulous work that the team are undertaking, please join us at one of the workshops that we will be hosting in both South and North Wales.

SW@H is a new and innovative way of working, where partners across Cwm Taf University Health Board, Rhondda Cynon Taf and Merthyr Tydfil Country Borough Councils have joined forces to create a truly integrated way of working together to support those being discharged from hospital.

How do we do this? We are an integrated, multidisciplinary hospital based team made up of Assistant Therapy Practitioners, Occupational Therapists, Physiotherapists and Social Workers, whose primary focus is to either prevent individuals being admitted to hospital unnecessarily by providing early assessments in our A&E departments, but we also work to reduce an individuals overall length of stay by completing timely and robust ‘person focussed’ assessments and through using community based services to support someone in their own home rather than a hospital bed.

What’s new about this? Well, we work across 7 days, 12 hour shifts patterns but more importantly, we have enhanced our community based services across health and social care, such as the RCTCBC Support@Home and CTUHB @Home nursing service who also provide a 4 hour response and work across 7 days in order to provide robust support to individuals upon their discharge home. In a nutshell, we can deliver the following:

  • Through the development of the ‘Trusted Assessor role’ we can set up packages of support within a 4 hour time frame, 7 days per week
  • Rapid community response services to support the hospital based team (both health and social care)
  • Restart or increased packages of care to facilitate discharge to home, 7 days per week
  • We utilise a variety of problem solving options at A & E (including third sector services)
  • Everyone discharged home via us will have a individualised review of their needs within a 14 day period

Come and join us at our workshops where we will be talking through some real life cases and discussing how this model of practice has improved the quality of the services provided. #noplacelikehome #rightcareattherighttimeintherigthplace #personattheheart