GovCamp Cymru 2016: Using behaviour change to improve public services

How can behaviour change theory help to embed ideas generated at unconferences into organisations? Dyfrig Williams outlines his pitch for GovCamp Cymru.

Logo GovCamp Cymru / GovCamp Cymru's Logo

This year will be my third GovCamp Cymru, which for the second year in a row will be held the National Assembly for Wales’ Pierhead Building.

For the uninitiated, GovCamp Cymru is an unconference, where attendees make the agenda by pitching what they’d like to talk about at the start of the day. I’ve avoided pitching so far, but having attended a few unconferences now I think that now’s the time for me to finally get involved.

Behaviour change

This year the Good Practice Exchange at the Wales Audit Office has been working on Behaviour Change Festivals across Wales, with the event in Swansea taking place in the run up to GovCamp Cymru. I’ve heard about some fantastic examples of behaviour change over the past few months – from the Chimp Shop App that helps people to cut down on their drinking to the WiFi that encourages people to move out of the sun.

I’m really interested in how Behaviour Change theory could be applied to help change to happen as a result of an unconference. I’ve found unconferences to be great events that enable people to develop their thinking and gain new contacts. Many unconferences are rightly proud that they attract passionate people who are prepared to give up their weekends to make public services better. But what happens when we get back to the office, get back to reality and have to persuade everyone else to buy into the brilliant ideas we’ve had or heard over the weekend? How do we persuade our colleagues to make that innovation a reality?

Some theory to get us started

This is what I’d like to examine in my proposed session. How do we bring all our colleagues along with us on the public service improvement journey? As a starter for ten, Chris Bolton has written a good post on getting ideas accepted. To break down his post to a very basic level (via a slightly brutal overview, sorry Chris!), people might:

  • Pretend they’re not a maverick
  • Get leaders on side
  • Wait until the organisation is likely to be receptive
  • Or find a host organisation that accepts you

Helen Bevan also has a great presentation which is directly aimed at change makers that suggests that people:

  1. Start with yourself
  2. Work out what might help others to change
  3. Build alliances
  4. Don’t be a martyr

So if these are starting points (come to my session if you disagree!), how can we enable positive behaviour and service improvement to take place as a result of unconferences? I’d also love to hear about examples of how people have got their colleagues to buy into changes in order to improve public services. I reckon that by pooling our experiences and our knowledge, we can go a long way to figuring out how we can better implement changes to improve our work.

One thought on “GovCamp Cymru 2016: Using behaviour change to improve public services

  1. Pingback: GovCamp Cymru: Can we change behaviour for better public services? | Good Practice Exchange at The Wales Audit Office

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