Safer Newport – a local area focus plan

Ahead of our event ‘Working in partnership: Holding up the mirror’, Tracy McKim @Lady_McK from Newport City Council, tells us about the partnership between the Council and the Police following a crisis in the Pill area of Newport. Come along to our events in Cardiff and Llanrwst to see Tracy’s workshop where, along with Gwent Police, she will be discussing in more detail the partnership working to help improve this area of Newport.

OneNewport logo

Following serious public disturbances in the Pill area in the Autumn of 2016 the Council and Gwent Police led a partnership response known as the Pill Area Focus Plan.  The Council’s Policy and Partnership team brought together key stakeholders working in Pill including Gwent Police, the Council’s Youth Service, City Services, Environmental Health, and Trading Standards services along with partners including Newport City Homes and South Wales Fire and Rescue Service and a number of other service providers and put in place a wide range of interventions with the aim of:

  • Improving the wellbeing of the Pill community
  • Addressing the crime and ASB issues that concern the community
  • Building the community’s trust and confidence in the key partners
  • Promoting community involvement, a sense of pride and empowerment

Map-Pill

Key actions

The partners working in Pill are focusing on the key issues identified by local people.  Actions to date include:

  • A Public Spaces Protection Order (PSPO) was put in place by the Council to give the Police new powers to tackle three of the most common forms of anti-social behaviour, namely street drinking, use of psychoactive substances and anti-social gangs.
  • Seven ‘Pill Action Days’ have now been held with Council officers working alongside the Police and South Wales Fire and Rescue to enforce the PSPO, ensure private rented accommodation is safe and that traders, licensed premises and taxi companies are acting responsibly. The Action Day held in June also involved the Heddlu Bach/Mini Police (from Pill Primary School) in raising speed awareness and promoting recycling.
  • Gwent Police Operations Jewel and Gravitas targeting drug supply have resulted in 61 arrests and multiple convictions centred on addresses in Pill. Bikes used by drugs runners have been seized and destroyed.
  • An anti-gang message drama production has been shown in Newport Secondary Schools with a positive reception from pupils and staff.
  • A range of diversionary activities for young people have been delivered by the Youth Service, Newport Live and community organisations e.g. ‘The Bigger Picture’.
  • One of only three Mini Police projects, currently in Wales, is now running in Pill Primary School with an aim of building trust between the police and the community and developing young people’s learning, skills and experience.
  • The Council and other partners have supported the regular community clean-ups organised by Pride in Pill releasing staff to volunteer alongside local people.
  • A diversionary pathway is in place for sex workers to ensure that they are offered the multi- agency support they need, recognising that they may be victims of exploitation whilst also using enforcement powers against persistent offenders and kerb crawlers.
  • A joined-up approach to environmental enforcement has been developed by the Council e.g. closure notices for problem properties in Pill and planning enforcement for an unauthorised dwelling in the area.
  • Environmental Health and the Fire Service have undertaken several joint inspections of HMO properties and have identified unlicensed HMOs as well as safety defects.
  • Newport City Homes are progressing the £10m regeneration of their properties in Pill which will help to ‘design out crime’. They will shortly be opening a Community Hub in the Francis Close area to accommodate local groups and services, with the ‘Bigger Picture’ youth organisation based there.


Improved public perception

At the outset of the Pill project in January 2017, a community safety survey was undertaken so that residents could identify the issues that were of greatest concern, and to establish a baseline from which progress could be measured.  A follow-up survey was undertaken in October 2017 and the results indicate encouraging progress against key public perception measures.

  • The number of people who say they feel very unsafe walking alone after dark has fallen from 64% to 41%  (-36% improvement)
  • People who say that crime and ASB is more of a problem than last year has fallen from 43% to 26%  (-40% improvement)
  • People who say that they are satisfied/very satisfied with the service provided by the police and their partners has increased from 22% to 36%  (+63% improvement)
  • People who say that the service provided by the Police and their partners has got better compared to last year has increased from 15% to 38%  (+153% improvement)

Next steps

We are mindful of the need to make sure that the early progress is sustained over the long term.  All key partners have indicated that they intend to maintain their focus on Pill, in terms of neighbourhood policing resources, holding regular Pill Action days, enforcement activities and improving engagement with the local community.  The Pill Area Focus work programme will now be developed through the Public Service Board’s Wellbeing Plan interventions and Safer Newport. The Pill Area Focus work forms a model for the way in which we will need to work moving forward and in line with the Wellbeing of Future Generations Act – with a focus on integrated wellbeing goals, through collaborative working, with the involvement of communities and mindful of preventative approaches and long-term impacts.

Episode 5: Behaviour Change Insiders

barod.png

In Episode Five, Barod challenged us to “Swansea’s Got Jargon Busters”. This was run by Barod at the Swansea Behaviour Change Festival. The aim was to change behaviour around how people communicate, by getting them to take part in a game show where you get ‘buzzed out’ for using jargon. This podcast has four parts:

Part 1: Alan from Barod explains how Jargon Busters was developed;

Part 2: Alan and Simon from Barod take Chris from the Good Practice Exchange through an example of Jargon Busters (Chris doesn’t do very well);

Part 3: Anne from Barod talks about the evaluation of Jargon Busters and the impact on the behaviour of the people she spoke to,

Part 4: Ena from the Good Practice Exchange talks about how the experience of Jargon Busters changed her behaviour.

Useful Links:

The Barod website: www.barod.org

Easy Read version of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014

A blog post on the Party Blowers workshop that Barod ran at a Good Practice Exchange event in Cardiff

Episode 4: Behaviour Change Insiders

dave snowden

In Episode Four, Professor Dave Snowden explains his ‘Nudge Not Yank’ approach to behaviour change. Using narrative to identify where people are currently, their disposition to change and small nudges that will help then move. (2.45 – 8.15 mins)Andy Middleton talks about Minimum Viable Competency in key areas as a requirement for decision makers involved in trying to implement behaviour change as part of the Wellbeing of Future Generations Act. (8.20 – 21.10 mins)Professor Dave Snowden explains his Ritual Dissent Method.  Used to rapidly develop robust solutions that will stand up to examination in the real world. (21.15 – 27 mins). Listen below:

More details are available at the Wales Audit Office, Good Practice Exchange Podcast Page

Episode 3: Behaviour Change Insiders

episode 3

In Episode Three, Rachel Lilley from Aberystwyth University talks about changing how people think about energy use at home with Ymlaen Ceredigion. (1.43 – 9.20 mins). Then, Matt Stowe from Cartrefi Conwy explains the environmental improvements at Parc Peulwys Housing Estate, and how they changed behaviours and help gain a Keep Wales Tidy Green Flag award. (10.30 – 25.30 mins). Have a listen below:

Links to resources mentioned in the Podcast:

National Energy Action Cymru details of working with Ymlaen Ceredigion in partnership with Ceredigion County Council and Aberystwyth University including a link to a report from Rachel Lilley.

Parc Peuwlys Management Plan 2015-2020, produced by Cartrefi Conwy.  Report from BBC Wales on Parc Peulwys acheving the Keep Wales Tidy Green Flag award.

More details are available at the Wales Audit Office, Good Practice Exchange Podcast Page

Episode 2: Behaviour Change Insiders

wee wheel.PNG

In Episode Two, we speak to Chris Subbe, who explains the ‘Wee Wheel’ (pictured), introduced to reduce acute kidney injury for hospital patients (1.45 – 7.30 mins). Then, Olwen Williams speaks on the ‘Test no Talk’ approach to improve sexual health screening (8.00 – 21.30 mins). Have a listen below:

Links to resources mentioned in the podcast:

Chris Subbe blog, An audible patient voiceand 1000 Lives Wee Wheel page

1000 Lives Compendium of Outpatient Improvement, report by Olwen Williams on : Self triage innovation in sexual health services – Test no Talk.

 More details at the Wales Audit Office, Good Practice Exchange Podcast Page.

Episode 1: Behaviour Change Insiders

episode1

In Episode One, we speak with Rupert Moon, on working with rugby players at Rugby Gogledd Cymru to develop behaviours that went beyond the playing field (01.30 – 15.20 mins). Then, Professor Judy Hutchings talks to us about the KiVa anti-bullying programme in schools. Learning from Finland on how taking a whole school approach can change behaviours and reduce bullying (15.25 – 27.10 mins). Have a listen below:
square_bci

More details about the podcasts are available on our Behaviour Change Insiders Podcast Page.

Links to resources mentioned:

Wales Audit Office, Good Practice Exchange Podcast Page.

Bangor University KiVa Programme

Rupert Moon on sport and improving well being

Episode 1: Behaviour Change Insiders

episode1

In Episode One, we speak with Rupert Moon, on working with rugby players at Rugby Gogledd Cymru to develop behaviours that went beyond the playing field (01.30 – 15.20 mins). Then, Professor Judy Hutchings talks to us about the KiVa anti-bullying programme in schools. Learning from Finland on how taking a whole school approach can change behaviours and reduce bullying (15.25 – 27.10 mins). Have a listen below:
square_bci

More details about the podcasts are available on our Behaviour Change Insiders Podcast Page.

Links to resources mentioned:

Wales Audit Office, Good Practice Exchange Podcast Page.

Bangor University KiVa Programme

Rupert Moon on sport and improving well being

Episode 2: Behaviour Change Insiders

wee wheel.PNG

In Episode Two, we speak to Chris Subbe, who explains the ‘Wee Wheel’ (pictured), introduced to reduce acute kidney injury for hospital patients (1.45 – 7.30 mins). Then, Olwen Williams speaks on the ‘Test no Talk’ approach to improve sexual health screening (8.00 – 21.30 mins). Have a listen below:

Links to resources mentioned in the podcast:

Chris Subbe blog, An audible patient voiceand 1000 Lives Wee Wheel page

1000 Lives Compendium of Outpatient Improvement, report by Olwen Williams on : Self triage innovation in sexual health services – Test no Talk.

 More details at the Wales Audit Office, Good Practice Exchange Podcast Page.

Holding up the mirror together

Ruth MarksAhead of our seminar ‘Working in partnership: Holding up the mirror’, Ruth Marks @wcvaruth, Chief Executive of WCVA, has blogged for us about the importance of working together to better support individuals and communities across Wales.

Looking at life from a different perspective is good for all of us.

Over the summer holidays we sometimes get the chance to visit different places, catch-up with family and friends and make new memories. We also look forward to the autumn and moving ahead with our plans and ambitions.

As Chief Executive of WCVA, one of my ambitions is to extend the meaningful and impactful links between charities and community groups (the third sector) with local government, health and Welsh Government.

Being able to do this in partnership with the Wales Audit Office’s Good Practice Exchange and Academi Wales is a great opportunity.

On the 19 and 27 September there are two events in Cardiff and Llanrwst where partners can come together to look at how we can work together to better focus our efforts on supporting individuals and communities across Wales.

I imagine that there will be some key messages around a common language, respect, processes, tensions and resources. I think the most important aspect is to continue to not only hold up the mirror, but to polish it and make sure we are looking at ourselves and each other with fresh eyes, renewed energy and ambition to do the best we possibly can.

blog imageBy working together, respecting each other’s strengths, collaborating fairly, recognising the real value of volunteers, and understanding the legal responsibilities of charity trustees, we should be able to deliver better services.

From libraries, childcare, GP surgeries, schools, bin collection, swimming pools and hospital treatment – services are provided for all of us and we are all likely to need some type of public service in the future.

Who provides these services, on what basis and in what arrangements needs constant thought, discussion and regular review with the people who use them.

These seminars will be an invaluable opportunity to hold up the mirror – together.

A short history of the Food Group of the Wales Regional Centre for Expertise in Education for Sustainable Development and Global Citizenship

In September and November this year, we are working in partnership with Bangor University’s Sustainability Lab on the RCE Cymru event – ‘It’s good to share’, held in Bangor and Cardiff. Ahead of the event, Jane Powell has blogged about her experience of Regional Centres of Expertise (RCE) and the interesting history of the Food Group.

It’s fascinating to hear how this research has evolved over the years and has helped to shape the Food Manifesto for Wales along with the Well-Being of Future Generations (Wales) Act 2015. I am excited about the prospect that our young people in Wales are helping to shape the food system for the better.

Here’s Jane Powell sharing her project…

When I first came across the idea of a Regional Centre for Expertise for sustainability education – and RCE – for Wales, in 2008, I was sceptical about the latest acronym. It sounded so bureaucratic. But then I heard Julie Bromilow of the Centre for Alternative Technology talking about an RCE she’d visited in Japan, and the possibility of being part of a global network to solve a global problem seemed very appealing.

At the time, I was the Information Officer at Organic Centre Wales in Aberystwyth, organising school visits to farms and locally sourced school meals alongside my regular editorial duties. It was rewarding, but I longed to be part of something bigger, to compare our work with what others were doing, and to see how far we could take it. Above all I wondered what exactly we were doing. How were farm visits supposed to change anything? Why were the school meal projects so powerful, while running a stand at an event could sometimes be very tedious?

Perhaps the RCE could be a way of shaking things up, I thought. So I jumped at the chance to join a subgroup that would look at food education, along with Julie, Dr Jane Claricoates from the RCE secretariat at Swansea University and Dr David Skydmore of Glyndŵr University. Our first task, in 2011, was to write a topic paper, which explored what ‘transformative education’ might mean in the context of food and drew on our respective experiences as well as the research literature.

ACP_5538-1 copy

Next, we organised an event at Coleg Powys at which we used reflection and leisurely discussion to investigate how students, lecturers and local food producers related to the food chain. This was intended to give an idea of how food education could be effective, by connecting with people’s existing understanding and values. It also revealed the richness of the human experience that lies behind the facts and figures of the food system.

After that, although we attracted some new members and continued to meet for a year or two, the group began to disperse. Illness and job changes were part of that, and maybe the RCE was too peripheral to our various job descriptions to get the attention it deserved. However, the central concept of collaboration between higher education and practitioners turned out to be very durable, as did our question about what makes food education transformative. The Food Group morphed into an enquiry held by a loose network.

In 2014 funding from the Welsh Rural Development Programme to Organic Centre Wales allowed us to take this to a new level with an action research project we called Food Values. This took research from social psychology and applied it to food education, and it turned out to be a powerful approach which brought fresh insights to many of us involved with food education. It later became the basis for the Wales Food Manifesto which holds a vision for a Welsh food system that is held together by shared values of care, fairness and equality.

Food Values exemplified the ethos of the RCE, even if it wasn’t technically part of it. It was a collaboration between higher education, in the shape of Dr Sophie Wynne-Jones and her colleagues first at Aberystwyth University, then Bangor, and the wider community, exemplified by the Public Interest Research Centre, Organic Centre Wales and a host of NGOs and individuals, from Age Concern in Gwynedd to the United Reform Synagogue in Cardiff. It enabled a very rich and inspiring exchange between academia and practitioners that benefited both sides.

AU Chris presents

When you regularly teach groups and organise community events, as I do, it’s easy to get burnt out and demotivated. The connection with researchers can bring a fresh perspective that allows us to go deeper into our practice, and to take more satisfaction from what we are doing well. For academics, I imagine, it must be rewarding to be involved in projects that have an immediate benefit and show theoretical principles at work in everyday life. And although we didn’t manage to make any connections with the global RCE network, that would obviously add yet more value to the process.

Susanne-plus-two.jpg

The Food Group is dormant now, but its work lives on, and there is so much more we could do.  As Welsh schools prepare for a major reform of the curriculum and the Well-Being of Future Generations Act starts to take effect, the opportunities are huge. Could RCE Cymru in its new guise offer the opportunity for another round of collaboration on food education? Read our blog and get in touch with Jane Powell.

Jane Powell worked for Organic Centre Wales from 2000 to 2015 and is now a freelance education consultant and writer. She is Wales coordinator for LEAF Education, a member of the Dyfi Biosphere Education Group, and editor of the Wales Food Manifesto. Based in Aberystwyth she is active in community food projects, including a garden at the university. Her website is www.foodsociety.wales.